Mycelial life lessons

Mycelial life lessons

Brief thoughts about temporality inspired by mycelial morphological behaviour.

The world as we know it is a perception of our own mind, it doesn't exist before we name it or give it a meaning. Meaning is created when many people weave together a common network of stories. However, we like to believe that our lives have some objective meaning, and that our actions matter to something beyond the stories in our head. The truth is that the lives of most people only have a meaning within the network of stories they tell to one another. Yet, over time, the interlacement of meaning unravels and a new complex tissue is grown in place. What seems to be the most important thing in life at one point can become utterly meaningless to another generation.

Everything is made out of sophisticated biological algorithms and the world we perceive is a pattern of those algorithms. Even our emotions, thoughts and imagination are, according to the most up-to-date biological theories, a cascade of electric signals shot by billions of neurons. Our sensations are thus biochemical data-processing algorithms. Consequently, the mind is a flow of interconnected experiences. It flickers for a brief moment and then vanishes away. There is no reason to think the mind is eternal, it constantly arises, then immediately disappears. So, perceptions are a dynamic stream that constitute our temporary consciousness. 

 

Image: © Kirill Ignatyev